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   · Home
   · Before the Battle
   · Leading to War
   · Battle of West Point
   · After the Battle
   · Key People
   · Armament
   · Civil War Timeline
   · Re-enactments
   · Railroad
   · Local Industry
   · Links
   · Association
   · Directions 

 

 

      Battle Of
       West Point
 After the Battle

Grigg's House

        Miss Carrie Lou Griggs lived in the home just below the fort. The house, which stands to this day, had been occupied by Union troops early in the day. From here, the fatal shots that killed General Tyler were fired.  She remembered in a signed paper dating around 1913-1914 that, “She returned to her home at dark to find everything in ruin and confusion… silver, jewelry, everything of any value was gone…  most of the bedding had been used for the wounded, the sheets being used for bandages.

        Her first thought was for the dead.

She went to the hillside with her children, Persia and Willie Griggs, and her brother Robert McCants. In the moonlight, she helped to straighten the dead, fold their hands and wash their faces.

       

That morning the roses were in bud, by night every bush was covered with full blown roses. The heavy cannonading had causes them to open.”  

Next Page    Railroad Destroyed

 

Source:

Joe Keith, Jr., "Aftermath: Written for the 130th Anniversary of the Battle of West Point"  

    

 

Fort Tyler is an official Civil War Discovery Trail site.  
          The Civil War Discovery Trail links more than 
          300 sites in 16 states to inspire and to teach 
          the story of the Civil War and its haunting 
          impact on America. The Trail, an initiative 
          of the Civil War Preservation Trust, allows 
          visitors to explore battlefields, historic 
          homes, railroad stations, cemeteries, parks, 
          and other destinations that bring history to 
          life. For more information on the Civil War 
          Discovery Trail and the Civil War Preservation 
          Trust, see www.civilwar.org Fort Tyler is an official Civil War Discovery Trail site.  
          The Civil War Discovery Trail links more than 
          300 sites in 16 states to inspire and to teach 
          the story of the Civil War and its haunting 
          impact on America. The Trail, an initiative 
          of the Civil War Preservation Trust, allows 
          visitors to explore battlefields, historic 
          homes, railroad stations, cemeteries, parks, 
          and other destinations that bring history to 
          life. For more information on the Civil War 
          Discovery Trail and the Civil War Preservation 
          Trust, see www.civilwar.org

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